How To Run Your Own Wallet Server

This guide will walk you through the process of setting up a LBRY wallet server. This involves provisioning a web server and setting up some services (docker, lbrycrd, and the wallet server). At the end, you’ll have your own connection to the LBRY network.

note: This is early-stage stuff. You may encounter unexpected issues. Please be patient and don’t hesitate to reach out for help.

Provision a fresh server

We recommend a dual-core server with at least 8GB RAM, 50GB disk, and a fresh Ubuntu 18.04 install.

I tested this guide on AWS using a t3.large instance and the ami-07d0cf3af28718ef8 image. If you’re using AWS, create your instance in the us-east-2 (Ohio) region. That’s where our snapshots are stored, so downloading them will be faster for you.

Make sure your firewall has ports 9246 and 50001 open. 9246 is the port lbrycrd uses to communicate to other nodes. 50001 is the wallet server RPC port.

Install Docker & Docker Compose

sudo apt install -y apt-transport-https ca-certificates curl software-properties-common && \
curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add - && \
sudo add-apt-repository "deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu $(lsb_release -cs) stable" && \
sudo apt install -y docker-ce docker-ce-cli containerd.io && \
sudo systemctl enable docker && sudo systemctl start docker && \
sudo curl -L "https://github.com/docker/compose/releases/download/1.24.1/docker-compose-$(uname -s)-$(uname -m)" -o /usr/local/bin/docker-compose && \
sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/docker-compose

Download our docker-compose.yml

You can see it here.

curl -L "https://raw.githubusercontent.com/lbryio/lbry-sdk/master/docker/docker-compose-wallet-server.yml" -o docker-compose.yml

Start the servers

sudo docker-compose up --detach

Check that everything worked

The first time you start the wallet server, it will take a few minutes to download a recent snapshot of the database and extract it. You can follow the progress with

sudo docker-compose logs --follow

After the wallet server has caught up, it will bind to port 50001 and start responding to requests. You can check if this happened by running

sudo netstat -tlpn | grep 50001

If there is no output, the port is ont bound yet and the server is still catching up. Check the logs for more info.

After the wallet server is ready, check that it responds to basic RPC calls:

echo '{"id":1,"method":"server.version"}' | timeout 1 curl telnet://localhost:50001

You should see a response like {"jsonrpc": "2.0", "result": ["0.46.1", "0.0"], "id": 1}. If you do, congratulations! You’ve set up your own wallet server.

Get in touch

Whether you got to the end without a hiccup or you got stuck along the way, we want to hear from you. Join our Discord to get help, stay updated, and talk to other wallet server operators.